Talk 1

Title: PointRend:Image Segmentation as Rendering

Speaker: Li Gou

Abstract:

We present a new method for efficient high-quality image segmentation of objects and scenes. By analogizing classical computer graphics methods for efficient rendering with over- and undersampling challenges faced in pixel labeling tasks, we develop a unique perspective of image segmentation as a rendering problem. From this vantage, we present the PointRend (Point-based Rendering) neural network module: a module that performs point-based segmentation predictions at adaptively selected locations based on an iterative subdivision algorithm. PointRend can be flexibly applied to both instance and semantic segmentation tasks by building on top of existing state-ofthe-art models. While many concrete implementations of the general idea are possible, we show that a simple design already achieves excellent results. Qualitatively, PointRend outputs crisp object boundaries in regions that are oversmoothed by previous methods. Quantitatively, PointRend yields significant gains on COCO and Cityscapes, for both instance and semantic segmentation. PointRend’s efficiency enables output resolutions that are otherwise impractical in terms of memory or computation compared to existing approaches.

Supervisor: Maojie Wu

Talk 2

Title: Deep CG2Real: Synthetic-to-Real Translation via Image

Speaker: Yujia Huang

Abstract:

We present a method to improve the visual realism of low-quality, synthetic images, e.g. OpenGL renderings. Training an unpaired synthetic-to-real translation network in image space is severely under-constrained and produces visible artifacts. Instead, we propose a semi-supervised approach that operates on the disentangled shading and albedo layers of the image. Our two-stage pipeline fifirst learns to predict accurate shading in a supervised fashion using physically-based renderings as targets, and further increases the realism of the textures and shading with an improved CycleGAN network. Extensive evaluations on the SUNCG indoor scene dataset demonstrate that our approach yields more realistic images compared to other state-of-the-art approaches. Furthermore, networks trained on our generated “real” images predict more accurate depth and normals than domain adaptation approaches, suggesting that improving the visual realism of the images can be more effective than imposing task-specifific losses.

Supervisor: Xiao Liang

 

Time:16:00  October 21, 2021

Address:MingLi Buliding C1102

Chair: Jiahao Chen